Watch the Stars

Tonight I went out to watch the stars and Moon. We’ve had so much snowy weather since most of February that I never got a clear sky at night. Missed the Super Moons in January and February. There’s another, last one of the year, Super Moon coming next week, at the beginning of Spring. Out here in the high desert there is no light to interfere with sky watching and I was very much disappointed when unable to see the Super Moons, especially the Super Blood Moon. (There was a Super Blood Moon the day I received my stem cell transplant in late September of 2015. I believed it was a good omen.) But, tonight as the Moon waxes toward fullness, I am happy to go out and see what I can see of the stars and Moon.

Orion is always the most visible, even as the Moon’s light dims most of the stars.. There are other constellations I don’t know but I am always anchored into place when I find Orion’s Belt. Orion is my son’s middle name. By the time he was two years old he could see Orion’s Belt and knew it was connected to his name. When we named him many people didn’t know that Orion is a constellation. They thought it was only a movie production company! That was sad to me. We should know at least some of the easiest constellations.

Here there is still snow covering most of the landscape. It is still outside, quiet, and the Moon’s light reflects off the snow. It is beautiful and I am grateful for these moments when I can see the stars and Moon, the imposing snow-covered mountains, and to experience the silence of the land.

When I lived on the Big Island of Hawaii, I would go out at night and lay down in a hammock, after my children were asleep. It was a sad time, my marriage ending and the sorrows of divorce visited upon my children just beginning. I would lie in the hammock and be overwhelmed by the night skies where the Milky Way was a dense carpet of stars and so many other stars I could not name, all shining above me. These moments gave me peace in a sorrowful time. I felt dizzy with the depth and density of the stars overhead. I heard a story then about a boy who was camping with his parents on the beach. He was frightened by all the stars. And, I learned of another person here on the mainland, who said she was also frightened by the stars. I didn’t understand how the silent, faraway lights of stars could frighten. I still don’t but I know I am unhappy when I don’t get to watch the stars and see the Moon. New Moons are best for star watching, of course.

Even as a very young girl I wanted to learn the constellations. I wonder what drew/draws me to the stars? Is it the innate wisdom of our bodies remembering that we are made from stardust in the very beginning of Life on Earth? All the energy of the universe is in our creation as humans. And there are rocks and earth, the dust to which we return they say. I hold a rock in my hand and gaze into its density, wondering how long it’s been tumbling on this Earth? Longer than humans, I am certain. You hold time in your hands when you hold a rock.

There is a song, from years and years ago, that I halfway can remember the lyrics to and sing to the nighttime sky, to the stars and the Moon. Here are the lyrics and a link to the group singing it so long ago:

Watch The Stars

watch the stars see how they roam
watch the stars see how they roam
you know the stars roam down
at the setting of the sun
watch the stars see how they roam

watch the wind see how it blows
watch the wind see how it blows
you know the wind shall blows
when the sun goes down
watch the wind see how it blows

watch the moons see how it glows
watch the moons see how it glows
you know the moon is gonna glow
when when the sun goes down
watch the moons see how it glows

watch the star see how they roam
watch the star see how they roam
you know the star roam down
at the setting of the sun
watch the star see how they roam
see how they roam
see how they roam

Writer(s): Jacqui Mcshee, John Renbourn, Bert Jansch, Terry Cox, Danny Thompson

Album: Pentangle, Sweet Child (1968)

2 thoughts on “Watch the Stars

  1. Wonderful! It’s amazing how Gary has taught the girls how to read the stars and the sun and the moon…one more thing that connects them to you! Hugs and ❤️

  2. I so grieve the loss of stars in my night sky, buried in the avalanche of city lights. I’ve even hope for clear skies on an ocean cruise, but those are lost to the reflection of the ship’s lights off the water. I have not seen the Milky Way in decades. I know how you feel.
    Tom

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